Refill Balance

Buy Mp3 Downloads

Pay $25 get $5 extra!

Pay $50 get $20 extra!

Pay $100 get $50 extra!

Find out more »
Verified by Visa MasterCard SecureCode
play pause
stop
volume
close
%s1 / %s2

Avalon: A Celtic Legend

Enaid

Avalon: A Celtic Legend

Reviews

  • Currently 4.0/5 Stars.

Type: Album

Sampling: 44,1 kHz

Source: CD

Tracks: 10

Language: English

Total size: 99.80 Mb

Year: 2002

Total price: $1.20

Genres:


#
Title
Price
Bitrate
Duration
Size
1
$0.12
320
03:40
8.4 Mb
2
$0.12
320
04:39
10.64 Mb
3
$0.12
320
03:34
8.18 Mb
4
$0.12
320
04:40
10.7 Mb
5
$0.12
320
04:10
9.53 Mb
6
$0.12
320
03:55
8.97 Mb
7
$0.12
320
04:49
11.04 Mb
8
$0.12
320
04:46
10.91 Mb
9
$0.12
320
04:12
9.6 Mb
10
$0.12
320
05:10
11.83 Mb


Please log in to your account to review this album.


This is a great album. For those who don't know, "Enaid" is actually David Arkenstone (or possibly David and Diane Arkenstone working together.) The man has at least two other musical alter-egoes (Ah*Nee*Mah and Troika) and my ability to keep track of himselves is waning by the year... Heh.

Anyway, my one criticism of this work is my typical gripe about the Arkenstones - too much "poundy-pound-pound-pound." This could have been a much more thoroughly relaxing listen if it weren't so percussive. I would really like to hear an album from one or both of them that has absolutely no drums and just focuses on melody and harmony in a very smooth, even kind of way. That being said, it's still pretty easy on the ears where the percussion occurs, and a true delight to hear where he/they manage to keep it down.

I would describe the general theme of the music as regal, as well as (for the most part) cheerful and celebratory. It calls to mind images of green countrysides where magickal folk study and practice their ancient spiritual arts, and magnificent castles where chivalry and honor rule the land and day (and I should certainly hope so, whereas it's an Arthurian-themed album.)

Even many of the characters of Arthurian legend who tend to be assigned the "villain" role are depicted (or at least alluded-to) in a dignified and harmonious light. For someone fascinated with the sorcerers, wizards, witches, etc in ancient legend, this is refreshing. Too often, works of art depicting such people make us out to be spooky and malefic. But the song "Enchantment," whose female-voiced chanting would seem to be a reference to Morgan le Fey, has mystique with class and even enthusiasm. This album focuses tonally on the wonder and mystery of magick, the virtue and bliss of love, and the gallantry and might of knighthood.

One final comment, not so much a criticism as a note of confusion, pertains to the arrangement of tracks on the album. "Guinevere's Tears" comes before "The Wedding," which further precedes "Arthur's Farewell." As a funerary sort of song, that the latter should be the last track makes sense, but assuming "Guinevere's Tears" is a reference to the death of Arthur at the hands of Mordred, the fact that it comes before "The Wedding" (presumably of Arthur and Guinevere) is kind of disorienting.

Overall, four out of five stars. No major complaints here, but lots of fun in the listening. =)

Sign In


Username
Password
Remember me

Sign Up! » Forgot Your Password? »