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Rush

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Reviews

  • Currently 4.0/5 Stars.

Type: Album

Sampling: 44,1 kHz

Source: CD

Tracks: 8

Language: English

Total size: 62.06 Mb

Year: 2004

Total price: $0.96

Genres:


#
Title
Price
Bitrate
Duration
Size
1
$0.12
320
03:50
8.8 Mb
2
$0.12
320
02:51
6.54 Mb
3
$0.12
320
03:28
7.94 Mb
4
$0.12
320
03:28
7.95 Mb
5
$0.12
320
03:50
8.79 Mb
6
$0.12
320
02:54
6.63 Mb
7
$0.12
320
03:17
7.51 Mb
8
$0.12
320
03:27
7.91 Mb


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Just about every band at some point thinks about doing a cover song. If a band is around long enough, they almost definitely do at least one cover on their albums, maybe more live. When they decide to do a full album, it's usually meet with eye rolls. It's often a sign that they don't have anything left creatively, and fans brace themselves for the worst. Maybe they throw a few stale tracks that everyone has covered, and it sounds terrible. This album, however, is a whole lot of fun. It's a real surprise just how entertaining it is.

Rush has a very distinctive sound and style, you can pretty much tell after a few seconds if a song is one of theirs. They are a progressive rock trio with a huge catalog of songs, an amazing drummer in Neil Peart, guitars led by Alex Lifeson that are very full and layered, and of course a lead singer in Geddy Lee who has an amazingly high and distinctive voice. So lending this sound to well-known songs is a risky proposition. Rush has never been afraid of taking risks, so they took this one head-on, and produced some amazing results.

The first song they tackle is "Summertime Blues", a song Eddie Cochran released in 1958 that has since been covered hundreds of times. Rush simply jams on it, adding in a little feedback, not forcing their trademark sound on the song, but just relaxing and playing. It's one of the best covers I've heard of the song. The Who famously played this song for a time, and they made sure the audience knew Who was playing, forcing some of their trademark guitar riffs into the song, but Rush smartly eschews this. They come off like they are having some fun during a sound check.

Speaking of The Who, Rush does a killer version of their song "The Seeker". They have left their art rock leanings at the door, and just rock out. The sing features a consistent did that plays throughout, and the band just fills in the space aroundthe riff as Lee does a kind of cleaned up Roger Daltry impression.


Another great track here is their choice of Buffalo Springfield's "For What It's Worth", a quiet anti-war sing popularized in the 60's. Rush adds a single layer of guitars under the track, keeping the original feel of the understated song while adding new touch. Lesser musicians might have overwhelmed the track, choosing to use the quieter pats as a chance to show off, but Rush makes the right choice and maintain a consistent tone throughout.

Of course, a track like "Crossroads" is designed for a little showing off, and the guys cut loose with their blues chops here. Several of the tracks here are rooted in blues rock, and Rush clearly feels comfortable in this area

Cover albums are often skippable at best, but this one came as a real surprise. It isn't overstated, the song selection is intriguing, and the band sounds very relaxed, which translates well to the listener. It's a lot a fun, sounds great and is worth the small investment.

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