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Journeyman

Eric Clapton

Journeyman

Reviews

  • Currently 4.0/5 Stars.

Type: Album

Sampling: 44,1 kHz

Source: CD

Tracks: 12

Language: English

Total size: 130.44 Mb

Year: 1989

Total price: $1.44


#
Title
Price
Bitrate
Duration
Size
1
$0.12
320
04:45
10.86 Mb
2
$0.12
320
04:11
9.57 Mb
3
$0.12
320
05:14
12 Mb
4
$0.12
320
05:34
12.74 Mb
5
$0.12
320
03:14
7.41 Mb
6
$0.12
320
02:28
5.63 Mb
7
$0.12
320
05:39
12.93 Mb
8
$0.12
320
04:08
9.45 Mb
9
$0.12
320
06:25
14.67 Mb
10
$0.12
320
05:33
12.71 Mb
11
$0.12
320
05:52
13.43 Mb


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Eric Clapton has been a lynchpin in the history of blues-rock. As a member of such groups as the Yardbirds and Cream, he built a large catalog of standards, songs that many still use in learning guitar. One-off groups Blind Faith and Derek and the Dominos made massive splashes, redefining the boundaries of blues rock, and leading the way for hard rock and jam bands. Having had enough of the structure of bands, he struck out on his own, and continued to be a force in rock. As time went on and music evolved, Clapton evolved with it, generating a number of pop hits that captured the basic arrangements of the time, but eschewed synthesizers in favor of his beloved guitars. Time moved on, and music would go towards a grungier sound that Clapton just couldn't embrace. He directed his music more towards adult contemporary, to blues roots, and eventually nostalgia. This is his last studio album as a pop force.

1989 found music on the cusp of something new. The 80's embraced excess, but a new decade brought new sensibilities. Clapton was no stranger to change, but find himself a member of rock royalty, and in a place where he could do whatever he wanted to do. His heart was always in the blues, and with the strength of his guitar. He bid farewell to the 80's with "Journeyman", an album from a man who had bounced from band to band, then from style to style, and maybe was ready to settle down.

But not without a fight; the album opens with "Pretending", which begins with a piano into, perhaps pretending that it will be something completely different before Clapton's trademark guitar kicks in. This is a good, upbeat rocker, a good way to kick off the album, and a single that would see some chart success.

Clapton loves the blues, and they are well represented here. "Hounds Dog" is a very different take on the sing you know. "Before You Accuse Me" is classic blues in content and structure.

The jewel of the album is "Bad Love". It's a slickly produced song, but with some real biting guitars, and the best solo on the album. The album never loses it's attachment to the blues, by remains accessible to the popular music fan, to date the last time Clapton was able the accomplish this in a studio album. He's since gone headfirst into adult contemporary and early blues, fine stuff, but without the ballsy licks of Journeyman. This is his commercial peak, and the end of his connection to the current scene, but he goes out with a bang. An excellent listen.

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