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Moseley Shoals

Ocean Colour Scene

Moseley Shoals

Reviews

  • Currently 5.0/5 Stars.

Type: Album

Sampling: 44,1 kHz

Source: CD

Tracks: 12

Language: English

Total size: 125.03 Mb

Year: 1996

Total price: $1.44


#
Title
Price
Bitrate
Duration
Size
1
$0.12
320
04:55
11.25 Mb
2
$0.12
320
03:06
7.1 Mb
3
$0.12
320
03:43
8.52 Mb
4
$0.12
320
03:37
8.27 Mb
5
$0.12
320
05:09
11.79 Mb
6
$0.12
320
04:02
9.22 Mb
7
$0.12
320
03:43
8.53 Mb
8
$0.12
320
04:24
10.07 Mb
9
$0.12
320
04:03
9.28 Mb
10
$0.12
320
05:32
12.68 Mb
11
$0.12
320
04:26
10.15 Mb
12
$0.12
320
07:56
18.15 Mb


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Voted the 33rd greatest album of all time by Q readers, Moseley Shoals bursts into life with the emphatic Riverboat Song; well known as "The Famous Intro" to an iconic 90s Friday night tv programme hosted by Chris Evans. The song features an infectious guitar riff which has very much stood the test of time.

Following on from the Riverboat Song is another 90s classic number The Day We Caught The Train. A commercial success, it comes as no surprise this indie anthem has made it's way onto many compilation albums of the era.
The day we Caught the train beautifully progresses into the Circle, the opening lyric "Saturday afternoon, the sunshine pours like wine through your window" immediately provokes a tranquil image in the mind of the listener; and with references to golden June combined with an upbeat melody, this track possesses a warmth very reminiscent of a summer's day.

The album then calms down to a gentler pace for the next couple of tracks, with the slightly more melancholic Lining your pockets & the acoustic Fleeting Mind.

Policemen & Pirates picks up the pace again with a catchy tune and flowing lyrics, before the album starts its final descent into a mellow, but strong finish, with the deceptively beautiful Downstream, and the almost hypnotic final number Get Away.

All in all, a classic 90s album, full of searching and often bittersweet lyrics, set against the backdrop of some tender melodies and unmistakably solid guitar riffs.

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