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No Parlez

Paul Young

No Parlez

Reviews

  • Currently 4.0/5 Stars.

Type: Album

Sampling: 44,1 kHz

Source: CD

Tracks: 12

Language: English

Total size: 147.95 Mb

Year: 1983

Total price: $1.44


#
Title
Price
Bitrate
Duration
Size
1
$0.12
320
07:56
18.17 Mb
2
$0.12
320
05:01
11.48 Mb
3
$0.12
320
06:02
13.8 Mb
4
$0.12
320
04:20
9.93 Mb
5
$0.12
320
04:54
11.23 Mb
6
$0.12
320
04:08
9.47 Mb
7
$0.12
320
05:52
13.42 Mb
8
$0.12
320
03:35
8.19 Mb
9
$0.12
320
07:29
17.13 Mb
10
$0.12
320
03:56
8.99 Mb
11
$0.12
320
04:32
10.38 Mb
12
$0.12
320
06:53
15.75 Mb


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This was where it all began for Paul Young. The album is one of the most interesting around, with Mr Young covering artists as ranged as Joy Division to Bob Marley with his special brand of early 80s electro-pop. The album is a very quirky and interesting piece of which there is no other that is anything like it.
Come back and stay is a great example of what electronica sounded like when it was young, with the early synthesisers and scratching sounds playing a big part, the extended version of the song that is on the album is perhaps extended a little too far going for almost 8 minutes. With the novelty wearing off after 6. The cover of Joy Division’s Love will tear us apart is brave to say the least. Mr Young re-does the song so that the dark gloom of the original is no where to be found, instead you hear an 80s dance love song. No doubt many will see this as blasphemous but he does do a good job at creating a new sound. Paul also does a beautiful cover of Bob Marley’s wherever I lay my hat (that’s my home). While it possesses a slight reggae feel Paul Young has made it into his own song. The title track, which is an Anthony Moore cover, is a curious piece with all sorts of things going on,sounding like an 80s version of Syd Barret.
Love of the common people, the major hit from the album, is a landmark anthem that still stands up strong some two decades later. Paul pours a lot of emotion into his voice and also does some great vocal/breathing effects. Oh woman is a fast paced dance track that has a lot of energy. Iron out the rough spots is an amazing mix of an 80s electronic sound with an early R&B style; the result is quirky and unique!
There are a large number of cover versions here for a full- length solo album, yet curiously this was where Paul Young’s stronger material came out. He had a great knack for taking other people’s music (especially R&B artists) and creating something completely new and original with it. A talent, which hardly anyone else has, and even, fewer can do
at the high frequency level that is done here. The result is an album that is like no other! Another element that cannot be overstated is the power of Paul Young’s voice, which is full of emotion and readily able to adjust to complement the music.

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