Refill Balance

Buy Mp3 Downloads

Pay $25 get $5 extra!

Pay $50 get $20 extra!

Pay $100 get $50 extra!

Find out more »
Verified by Visa MasterCard SecureCode
play pause
stop
volume
close
%s1 / %s2

Pinkerton

Weezer

Pinkerton

Reviews

  • Currently 5.0/5 Stars.

Type: Album

Sampling: 44,1 kHz

Source: CD

Tracks: 10

Language: English

Total size: 79.26 Mb

Year: 1996

Total price: $1.20


#
Title
Price
Bitrate
Duration
Size
1
$0.12
320
03:02
6.93 Mb
2
$0.12
320
02:53
6.59 Mb
3
$0.12
320
03:02
6.94 Mb
4
$0.12
320
02:08
4.9 Mb
5
$0.12
320
04:32
10.4 Mb
6
$0.12
320
04:17
9.81 Mb
7
$0.12
320
04:03
9.29 Mb
8
$0.12
320
03:59
9.11 Mb
9
$0.12
320
03:48
8.69 Mb
10
$0.12
320
02:53
6.61 Mb


Please log in to your account to review this album.


When 'Pinkerton' first came out, many had jumped to the conclusion that Weezer had hit a serious sophomore slump. This album is not quite as accessible as the band's self-titled debut, which had a winning formula of grunge-like riffs, classic rock guitar solos, power pop sensibility, nerdy lyrics, and intentionally awkward vibes. Sounding like little if not nothing else in mainstream music at the time yet highly infectious, 'The Blue Album' was a smash, and deservedly so. 'Pinkerton', on the other hand, was a financial disaster, barely cracking the Billboard Top 20 as opposed to its multi-platinum predecessor. On the album, Weezer turned to more of a hard rock sound infused with a few noise rock ideals. The production shows this more than anything of the individual songs, perfectly balancing rock and rawk. The band also eschewed the nerdy tendencies of the past and sang lyrics more akin to the Violent Femmes (other than the 'Madame Butterfly' references). In fact, this could be considered more of a Rivers Cuomo solo album, as the frontman wrote all ten of the songs on 'Pinkerton'. Despite these changes, Weezer have in fact crafted an album more vital-sounding and far more personal than their debut or anything following. It may not have appealed instantly, but it has gained a cult status among fans and critics alike over the years.

"Tired of Sex" reveals the more vulnerable theme of the album from the get-go. After a quiet yet dissonant intro, the band launches into what is possibly their hardest rocking song, with pounding riffs and Cuomo yelling of his frustration over meaningless flings. "Getchoo" has the band's most forceful chorus and a frenetic guitar solo. "No Other One" seems like the opposite of the first album's "No One Else" both musically and lyrically. "Why Bother?" recaptures the poppy elements of the band's previous work but combines them with the adolescent lyrics heard all over this album; it is also the shortest song on the album. "Across the Sea" recounts Cuomo's reaction to a fan letter from a Japanese girl. "The Good Life" is probably the most accessible song on the album and is the only song to have an accompanying music video; even still, it contains a section that is almost Sonic Youth-esque in its noisiness. In spite of it being the album's first single, "El Scorcho" is the most unorthodox song here, as it is filled with many bizarre and over-the-top vocals. "Pink Triangle" is tragically hilarious; its lyrics deal with being in love with a lesbian. If one views the album as a concept album, perhaps the crescendo of "Falling for You" represents the final straw before a heartbreaking finale. "Butterfly" is a melancholic acoustic ballad that finishes things off remorsefully but perfectly.

Considered by many to be vaguely autobiographical, Rivers Cuomo was so embarrassed over the general reaction to 'Pinkerton' that Weezer went on a five-year hiatus and played little from it live for years. Although the band have finally given it the respect it deserves, it remains unique in the band's discography, as none of their other albums are quite like this one, and only 'The Blue Album' matches it in terms of quality. It may not be as definitive as their debut, but it arguably tops it for its raw power and sheer emotional resonance. A worthy purchase for fans of Weezer, fans of hard rock in general, and mixed-up teenagers.

Sign In


Username
Password
Remember me

Sign Up! » Forgot Your Password? »