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Scenes From The Southside

Bruce Hornsby & The Range

Scenes From The Southside

Reviews

  • Currently 4.0/5 Stars.

Type: Album

Sampling: 44,1 kHz

Source: CD

Tracks: 9

Language: English

Total size: 110.23 Mb

Year: 1988

Total price: $1.08


#
Title
Price
Bitrate
Duration
Size
1
$0.12
320
05:28
12.53 Mb
2
$0.12
320
04:43
10.81 Mb
3
$0.12
320
04:36
10.54 Mb
4
$0.12
320
07:07
16.3 Mb
5
$0.12
320
07:30
17.19 Mb
6
$0.12
320
04:26
10.17 Mb
7
$0.12
320
04:28
10.24 Mb
8
$0.12
320
04:37
10.56 Mb
9
$0.12
320
05:12
11.89 Mb


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This is Bruce Hornsby and the Range's second album, the follow-up to 1986's "The Way It Is", their debut album which earned them the Grammy for Best New Artist. Hornsby's trademark has always been his virtuoso piano playing, and along with maybe Billy Joel and Elton John, he's a rare artist that has successfully managed to virtually replace the guitar with piano in his popular music.

Just as "The Way It Is" hit the charts with social commentary, so did "Look Out Any Window" from "Scenes From the Southside", this time with an environmental message. The sing had been criticized by some for being a bit heavy-handed; perhaps a little bit. But it has a like intro, and a fantastic piano solo at the bridge, and Hornsby just creates an amazing sound in this song.

Some may be surprised to see "Jacob's Ladder" here, as it was a hit for Huey Lewis and the News. Hornsby wrote the song for his longtime friend Lewis, and he included his own version on this album. His is a slightly slower tempo, but uses a similar arrangement. If you've never heard this version, is worth a comparison.

The big hit for the band from this album was "The Valley Road", which she number give on the Billboard chart. It's refrain repeated the phrase "Walk On", which tends to be how many remember the sing being titled. Most of the album is based on life in the south, a common theme in all of Hornsby's writing. This came from his observances of southern belles having dalliances, not being concerned with the after effects.

This album wasn't as radio friendly as the previous album, but there are many great songs here. "The Show Goes On" is a beautiful song, again giving focus to Hornsby's piano playing, and life in the south. "The Road Not Taken" is a slow, sad song about regrets stemming from a love from the past. This is not the typical 80's synth pop album, the writing has real substance, and the musicianship is top notch. This isn't even Hornsby's best, but it shows since of the range (pun intended) his playing has. If you liked "The Way It Is", there is a lot to enjoy here.

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