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Seventeen Seconds

The Cure

Seventeen Seconds

Reviews

  • Currently 5.0/5 Stars.

Type: Album

Sampling: 44,1 kHz

Source: CD

Tracks: 10

Language: English

Total size: 81.72 Mb

Year: 1980

Total price: $1.20


#
Title
Price
Bitrate
Duration
Size
1
$0.12
320
02:09
4.93 Mb
2
$0.12
320
03:41
8.44 Mb
3
$0.12
320
03:20
7.63 Mb
4
$0.12
320
04:08
9.48 Mb
5
$0.12
320
02:37
5.98 Mb
6
$0.12
320
00:52
2 Mb
7
$0.12
320
05:55
13.54 Mb
8
$0.12
320
03:04
7.01 Mb
9
$0.12
320
05:54
13.51 Mb
10
$0.12
320
04:01
9.2 Mb


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This album saw the Cure evolve from their punk rock roots towards the dark atmospheric sounds that they became famous for. It was also the first example of how they were to constantly develop their sound, something that made them one of the strongest bands of their time.

The album opens with the chilling 2 minute instrumental A Reflection. This is followed by the single A Play For Today. This showed the band doing a pop tune that was catchy, yet had the Cure’s darker edge at the same time. Secrets is a creepy piece that sees Robert Smith whisper his vocals in an agonizing tone. He also creates an interesting effect; having two sets of vocal tracks running along side each other which further adds to the creepy feel. Three is another chilling piece made up of various sound effects and Robert’s mutterings. The Final Sound, going for under a minute, is made up of a few piano tunes before fading away. This leads into one of the Cure’s biggest hits, A Forest. The power of this six minute epic cannot be exaggerated. Even 23 years after its creation it still drags the listener in. Furthermore the song has not aged a bit, with the ending bass line as breathtaking now as it was when the album was first released. M is another highlight (and one of the Cure’s best songs ever) that would have worked as a strong single while still retaining the Cure’s trademark edge. At Night is a six and a half minute epic that acted as a preview of what was to come in their following albums where their songs became longer and darker. The album closes with the dreary title track. While it isn’t the strongest track on the album it closes the album perfectly. The musicianship between the four members is flawless.

The combination of Robert Smith’s guitar and Simon Gallap’s bass works well in creating the dearly feel while Mathiew Hartley’s keyboards add the extra atmospheric dimension. Lol Tohurst’s drumming isn’t anything ground breaking, however his slow and simple use of the snare works well in further emphasizing the vibe of the record. There can be no doubt this was a very significant album both for the Cure and the whole eighties music scene (and beyond). More importantly this is the first demonstration of how The Cure managed to consistently be in a class ahead of the majority of other bands around them. While so many other bands would find a style and stick with it, The Cure, from the beginning, were finding ways to evolve their sound and offer something new and exciting on each record.

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