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Vheissu

Thrice

Vheissu

Reviews

  • Currently 5.0/5 Stars.

Type: Album

Sampling: 44,1 kHz

Source: CD

Tracks: 13

Language: English

Total size: 131.43 Mb

Year: 2005

Total price: $1.56


#
Title
Price
Bitrate
Duration
Size
1
$0.12
320
04:15
9.71 Mb
2
$0.12
320
03:56
9 Mb
3
$0.12
320
04:29
10.27 Mb
4
$0.12
320
04:02
9.25 Mb
5
$0.12
320
04:27
10.19 Mb
6
$0.12
320
04:01
9.2 Mb
7
$0.12
320
04:46
10.9 Mb
8
$0.12
320
04:27
10.17 Mb
9
$0.12
320
04:50
11.06 Mb
10
$0.12
320
05:52
13.43 Mb
11
$0.12
320
04:17
9.82 Mb
12
$0.12
320
03:39
8.36 Mb
13
$0.12
320
04:24
10.08 Mb


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Thrice - Vheissu. Thrice's fourth album is not only their most important in terms of their musical progression, but is quite possibly their best overall record. The magic of this album is held in it's 11 perfectly crafted songs. There simply isn't a dull moment, nor are there any two tracks that sound remotely similar. Up to this point in their careers, the four members of Thrice had formed themselves into a good post-hardcore band, maybe even a very good post-hardcore band. 2003's "The Artist In The Ambulance" showcases great songcraft with well-written and thoughtful lyrics and all four musicians doing things that at times will blow your mind. But Vheissu is where they became just a great band - with no real genre anchoring them down and keeping them in one place. They realized that they could just write great songs, and let the songs take them where ever they went.

"Image of the Invisible" begins this parade of perfection, and whilst it is definitely the most straight-forward rock anthem on the album, it is almost a red herring in terms of the albums overall direction. This was written as a radio single, and a darn good one at that, whilst Dustin Kensrue's yelling in the verses makes you want to scream along with him.

"The Earth Will Shake" has become a fan favourite, and the song is still often chosen as a closer to Thrice's live shows. It is ridiculously heavy while staying away from boring hardcore idioms. The tuning is drop-A, which will make any guitarist smile, and the bridge includes one of the finest moments on the whole album, and one of my personal favourite moments in music of all time. I won't ruin the surprise, but suffice it to say that you won't be expecting it. The whole song is very blues-y, which is unusual for a song of such weight.

"Atlantic" was named after the cold and open feeling the band got from hearing it played back, and it's not hard to see. It's very atmospheric, and almost mournful, but beautifully hopeful at the same time.

"For Miles" might be my single favourite song of all time. It is a study in light-and-dark, beginning with some very pretty but very technical classical piano, and culminating four minutes later in a noise you could lose your mind in. Kensrue's lyrics are at their best here, and his personal faith shows through in the words as he sings "there's no greater love than that one shed his blood for his friends".

"Hold Fast Hope" is perhaps the most ferocious song on the album, firing all cylinders in a frantic 5/4 beat that relents just long enough in the middle for the listener to catch their breath.

"Music Box" was written to the tune of an actual music box that guitarist Teppei Teranashi bought on the street whilst on tour in Japan. The music box plays in the background throughout the song to great effect, and it simply feels huge.

"Of Dust and Nations" showcases a lovely delayed guitar line and some very atmospheric, though driving beats throughout. Also a fan favourite live, the song has an extended outro that catches you up and transports you to a far-off place and time.

"Stand and Feel Your Worth" is possibly the most experimental track on the record, clocking in at around six minutes and taking you through multiple movements from the lightest of moods to the heaviest of screams. A real gem of a song, it took the longest to grow on me out of any of them, but is now one of the most rewarding listens.

"Red Sky" ends the album off in style: a lovely power ballad, Thrice-style, that you won't be able to listen to without singing along to. Great end to a fantastic album.

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